Looking at single mRNAs in neurons hints at memory formation

It is postulated that learning and memory are modulated by synaptic plasticity – molecular changes  that result in changes in the synapse morphology and signaling capacity. Local protein translation is considered important for synaptic plasticity. Two works from our lab were published last month (back to back!) in Science. Both papers deal with how beta-actin mRNA localization and dynamics in neurons may account for local protein translation upon stimulation, and hence, may supply insight into memory formation.

The first paper by Adina Buxbaum shows that beta-actin mRNAs in dendrites are “unmasked” upon activation of the dendrites. Using single molecule FISH, She noticed that the average number of probes bound to the mRNAs in dendrites (but not in adjacent glia cells) was lower than expects, and this number increased upon stimulation. Not only that, there were more mRNAs in the stimulated dendrites. This indicated masking by a protein “coating” that prevented FISH probe binding in the unstimulated cells. A modified FISH protocol which included a protease digestion step prior to probe hybridization showed that indeed the mRNAs were masked by proteins.

single molecule FISH for beta-actin mRNA in dendrites shows that mRNAs in unstimulated neurons are masked. A) Unstimulated neuron. B) stimulated neuron showing increased number of spots. C) Unstimulated neuron, in which the fixed cells were digested with protease prior to FISH probe hybridization. Source: Buxbaum, Wu & Singer (2014). Science Vol. 343  pp. 419-422

single molecule FISH for beta-actin mRNA in dendrites shows that mRNAs in unstimulated neurons are masked. A) Unstimulated neuron. B) stimulated neuron showing increased number of spots. C) Unstimulated neuron, in which the fixed cells were digested with protease prior to FISH probe hybridization. Source: Buxbaum, Wu & Singer (2014). Science Vol. 343 pp. 419-422

 

She further showed that this masking relates to other mRNAs, as well as to ribosomes, and that this is due to a metabolic process resulting from stimulation. Thus, this unmasking process may be a way to “activate” localized mRNAs for translation.

Apart from being a very neat paper technically and biologically, I think it was exceptionally entertaining to begin her paper by quoting an 1894 work by Cajal, the father of neuroscience.

The second paper by Hye-Yoon Park follows the dynamics of single molecule endogenous beta-actin mRNAs in neurons by live imaging, using the MS2 system. She shows movement of mRNAs along dendrites, as well as some events of merging or splitting – suggesting that some mRNAs are packed together in larger granules – which may regulate local translation. She also looked at brain slices, visualizing beta actin transcription dynamics. This is an important achievement since it is much harder to look at mRNA dynamics in tissue slices than in single cells on plate, due to background fluorescence. Though some biological insight is derived here, this is more of a “new technology” report.

Live imaging of beta-actin mRNAs in dendrites (movie. Source: Park HY et al. (2014) Science Vol. 343 pp. 422-424)

These papers are just the beginning of a long-term story of how mRNA localization and local translation are regulated in neurons.  A lot of cool experiments are being done in our lab in this regard and I’ll report more as they are published.

ResearchBlogging.orgBuxbaum AR, Wu B, & Singer RH (2014). Single β-actin mRNA detection in neurons reveals a mechanism for regulating its translatability. Science (New York, N.Y.), 343 (6169), 419-22 PMID: 24458642
Park HY, Lim H, Yoon YJ, Follenzi A, Nwokafor C, Lopez-Jones M, Meng X, & Singer RH (2014). Visualization of dynamics of single endogenous mRNA labeled in live mouse. Science (New York, N.Y.), 343 (6169), 422-4 PMID: 24458643

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