Category Archives: conferences & courses

RNA meeting 2019 – Part 1

The RNA society meeting is big. With over 150 talks and almost 700 posters, there’s a lot of new stuff to learn. This was my first RNA society meeting and I decided from the beginning to take it easy. That is why I did not live tweet like I usually do.

Instead, I thought of writing a summery blog post.

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ASCB15 – part 3

(part 1, part 2)

I ended part 2 Monday night. It was an exciting day with many excellent talks, but the best talk (mine, of course!) was due the next day.

Tuesday started with the seminar on engineering cells and tissues. There was the mandatory CRISPR talk as the great new thing in bio-engineering these days. Jennifer Doudna talked about the discovery, then went on to discuss new experiments (using Halo-tag to track Cas9 in live cell nuclei to study movement & binding kinetics) and improved technologies (transfect cells with pre-assembled Cas9-gRNA for quick editing & less off-target cleavage).

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ASCB15 – part 2

I ended Part 1 after the morning session on pushing the boundaries of imaging.

After the amazing talks on imaging, I browsed the halls, visited some exhibitors, sampled a couple of exhibitor tech-talks. I later went to a mycrosymposium (#2: signaling in health & disease). This was mainly to see how this ePoster thing works, but also I promised Qunxiang Ong – with whom I discussed optogenetics the day before – to be at his presentation. He used a light-induced dimerization of signaling proteins to study the effect on neurite growth. The nice thing in his system was that the cells were plated in wells which were partly dark – so light-induction cannot take place in these regions. This allowed for analysis of neurite growth in lit vs “light-protected” regions of the same cell.

After this session, I attended my first “discussion table”. Continue reading

ASCB15 part 1

The ASCB meeting brings scientists from all levels to talk about cell biology, which is actually almost anything “biology”. But there’s also a full program dedicated to other matters, like science careers, science publishing, science communications and science policy. This is also a great venue for companies to show their products, and for organizations/institutions to recruit new members. If I remember the numbers correctly, there were over 550 oral presentations and over 2,700 posters. I overheard someone saying there were ~6000 people attending the meeting. I typically go to RNA meetings that are mostly in the lower 100’s of participants. So, to me, that’s a large meeting.

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Announcements

I am aware that it has been a while since I updated new posts on fluorescent microscopy. I blame life. And work.
Anyway, I have several papers piled up, waiting to get blogged.

In other news, I wrote a blog post for Addgene blog. Addgene, for those of you who do not know, is a non-profit organization that helps biologists share plasmids. Briefly, researchers can send Addgene their plasmids (which were featured in their publications) and other researches can order these plasmids from Addgene at a relatively small fee (relative to the amount invested in cloning a plasmid). My post is about how to choose the best suited fluorescent protein, something I wrote about in this blog sporadically. It should get published soon.

On May 22 I’m going to present my work at the annual meeting of the Israeli Society for Cancer Research.

On July 12-13 I’m going to present my work at the Gordon-Merck Research Seminar on Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation  and the very next day at the Gordon Research conference on the same topic. You can still apply (for poster presentation only) for both of these.

On the publications’s front, a revised version of a paper I co-authored (which continues my work on the decay-transcription story) was recently sent back to the editors. We’re hoping for good news soon.

Am co-authoring review paper on mRNA localization for Nature Reviews Molecular & Cell Biology. Hope to submit within a couple of weeks.

And, the research I’ve been working on for the past two years is finally starting to take shape as a paper. Hope to submit within a month or so.

Also, for the first time, I’m now an official reviewer of a peer-reviewed journal ( RNA journal ).

iBiology Microscopy Course

Optical Nanoscopy Blog

Light microscopy has become one of the most useful tools in the life sciences. Following the traditions of great courses on light microscopy, such as those offered by the Marine Biological Laboratory, EMBO, and the NCBS in Bangalore, this free online comprehensive course begins with the basics of optics, proceeds through transmitted light microscopy, covers the various methods of imaging fluorescent samples, describes how cameras work and image processing, and concludes with some of the latest advances in light microscopy. In addition to lectures, they also provide labs (filmed at a microscope) and short tips, so as to cover pragmatics of how to use microscopes. Assessments are provided for each lecture. Enjoy learning microscopy!

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FISEB 2014 – day 3

Not a lot to say. The morning session on “life science policy & research funding in Israel” was somewhat informative, but too much policy discussion and not a lot of practical info.

Next was the oral poster session on genomic and transcriptomic regulation.  Can’t discuss it much since most is unpublished work. But most lectures were interesting. My lecture was very successful. Got a lot of interest. Am happy about it.

The last session was actually a panel of university presidents/rectors etc with us – the postdocs that were invited, as the next generation of young faculty members.

It was a very nice gesture but again, I was hoping for a more practical meeting. They did share some good advice on some subjects.

After that was the poster session. Very interesting work by Roee Amit from Technion on transcription imaging in bacteria. Not ready for publication yet but stay tuned. As usual, the lab of Yaron Shav-tal produces nice imaging on transcription. They are also developing something nice with the MS2 system which caused me to say “me wants” immediately. Again, can’t discuss till its published.

In the last post, I forgot to mention the plenary lecture of David Bartel. Quite insightful about miRNAs and poly-A tails. I should go read some of his latest papers.