Category Archives: Fluorescent microscopy

Local translation of ribosomal proteins in axons

A recent bioRxiv pre-print publication from Christine Holt’s lab suggests that ribosomes may be remodeled in axons by locally translated ribosomal proteins. This is surprising because we know that ribosomes are assembled in the nucleolus. Well, I have some concerns about a few of the experiments depicted there.

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Quantum dots for smFISH

Single molecule FISH is currently the best method to get accurate measurements of mRNA levels at single molecule, single cell level in cell culture or tissue slices with a spatial resolution of ~200 nanometer (or less). One of the drawbacks of this method is the deterioration of the fluorescent signal (bleaching) of the organic dyes that are used to label the probes. Andrew Smith’s lab from University of Illinois now show how FISH can work with quantum dots instead of organic dyes. This provides better fluorophore stability and also the possibility to have more colors with less overlap of the emission spectra.

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Single molecule peptide sequencing

One of the greatest breakthroughs of the past decade was the development of the next generation sequencing. Sequencing of DNA of course. It is relatively easy to sequence DNA  – the polymerase is doing it for you – simply add fluorescently labeled nucleotides. For RNA sequencing, we simply convert it into DNA. We now even have a method for in situ sequencing of RNA. But proteins pose a challenge. Now, maybe, this challenge can be overcome with a new-old method to sequence peptides.

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Intercellular mRNA transfer through membrane nanotubes – behind the scenes.

My paper was recently published. I suggest that you read it before reading this post (it is an open access paper). In this paper we show that full-length mRNA molecules can be transferred between mammalian cells through membrane nanotube-like extensions that connect the cells.

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Poking holes into membranes to label proteins for live imaging

There are two major way to label inner proteins, structures or organnelles for live cell imaging. The most common method is fusing the studied protein to a fluorescent protein. A second approach is the addition of labeling agents from outside the cells. However, many labels cannot penetrate through the cell membrane. This is true to some, but not all dyes, but more importantly, to larger agents, such as antibodies or DNA/RNA oligos. To allow these agents to enter cells, researchers can use microinjection, electroporation, bead-loading, or transfection (e.g. of short oligos).

In a paper just published in eLife, a new technique is described to form temporary holed in the cell membrane. These holes allow delivery of any labeling agent into cells. Continue reading

Imaging translation of single mRNAs in live cells

Translating the information encoded in mRNAs into proteins is one of the most basic processes in biology. The mechanism requires a machinery (i.e. ribosomes) and components (mRNA template, charged tRNAs, regulatory factors, energy) that are shared by all organisms on Earth. We’ve learned a great deal about translation over the last century. We know how it works, how it is being regulated at many levels and under varuious conditions. We know the structures of the components. We have drugs that can inhibit translation. With the emergance of next-gen sequencing, we can now perform ribosome profiling and determine exatly which mRNAs are being translated, how many ribosomes occupay each mRNA species and where these ribosomes “sit” on the mRNA, on average. New biochemical approaches like SILAC and PUNCH-P can quantifiy newly synthesized proteins & peptides. Yet, all of that information comes from population studies, typically whole cell populations. Rarely, whole transcriptome/ribosome analysis of a single cell is performed. Still, there is no dynamic information of translation, since cells are fixed and/or lysed. And there is no spatial information regarding where in the cell translation occurs (poor spatial information can be determined if cell fractionation is performed, which is never a perfect separation of organelles/regions and we are still not at the stage of single organelle sequencing).

Imaging translation in single cells is intended to provide both spatial and dynamic information on translation at the single cell and, hopefully, single mRNA molecule resolution. Recently, four papers were published (on the same day!) providing information on translation of single mRNAs. Here is a summary of these papers.

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The wild ride of the exosomes

Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that are thought to mediate cell-to-cell communication in eukaryotes. Briefly, exosomes are 50-100 nanometer (nm) sized vesicles produced by the endosomal system. They are exported out of the cell and can be found in every bodily fluid: plasma, saliva, milk, urine and more. These vesicles then enter recipient cells, and the cargo they carry (proteins, RNA molecules and lipids) modulate the physiology and/or gene expression of the recipient cell. Exosomes catch a lot of attention lately because of their clinical significance. First, exosomes might be used as biomarkers for some diseases (most importantly tumors). Second, they are being considered for therapeutics as a delivery system.

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