Category Archives: epi

Poking holes into membranes to label proteins for live imaging

There are two major way to label inner proteins, structures or organnelles for live cell imaging. The most common method is fusing the studied protein to a fluorescent protein. A second approach is the addition of labeling agents from outside the cells. However, many labels cannot penetrate through the cell membrane. This is true to some, but not all dyes, but more importantly, to larger agents, such as antibodies or DNA/RNA oligos. To allow these agents to enter cells, researchers can use microinjection, electroporation, bead-loading, or transfection (e.g. of short oligos).

In a paper just published in eLife, a new technique is described to form temporary holed in the cell membrane. These holes allow delivery of any labeling agent into cells. Continue reading

ASCB15 – part 2

I ended Part 1 after the morning session on pushing the boundaries of imaging.

After the amazing talks on imaging, I browsed the halls, visited some exhibitors, sampled a couple of exhibitor tech-talks. I later went to a mycrosymposium (#2: signaling in health & disease). This was mainly to see how this ePoster thing works, but also I promised Qunxiang Ong – with whom I discussed optogenetics the day before – to be at his presentation. He used a light-induced dimerization of signaling proteins to study the effect on neurite growth. The nice thing in his system was that the cells were plated in wells which were partly dark – so light-induction cannot take place in these regions. This allowed for analysis of neurite growth in lit vs “light-protected” regions of the same cell.

After this session, I attended my first “discussion table”. Continue reading

Tracking membranes by imaging – mCLING and surface glycans

Living cells exhibit many types of membranes which participate in most biological precesses, one way or another. Imaging membranes is usually acheived by two types of reagents: chemical dyes or fluorescent proteins that are targeted to the membrane itself or inside an organelle.

The chemical dyes are usually targeted to an organelle based on a specific chemical property of that organelle.

For example:

Rhodamine 123, tetramethylrosamine, and Mitotracker  are dyes that preferentially target mitochondria, due to its membrane potential. Mitotracker has thiol groups that allow it to bind to matrix proteins, thus making it more resistant to disruption of the membrane potential (e.g. by fixation).

Lysotracker are lypophilic, mildly basic dyes, which accumulate in the acidic lysosomes.

ER-tracker is a BODIPY (boron-dipyrromethene; a group of relatively pH insensitive dyes that are almost all water insoluble) based dyes which are linked to glibenclamide – a sulfonylurease – which binds to ATP sensitive Potassium channels exclusively resident in the ER membrane.

Long chain carbocyanines like DiL, DiO and DiD are lipophylic fluorescent molecules, which are weakly fluorescent in water, but highly fluorescent when incorporetaed into membranes, particularly the plasma membrane.

FM lipophylic styryl dyes bind the plasma membranes in a reversible manner and are also incorporated into internal vesicles.

On the other hand, fluorescent proteins (FP) are targeted to membranes or organelles by fusing them to either whole proteins that localize to a specific organelle, or to short peptides that carry a localization signal. Thus, a nuclear localization signal (NLS) targets the to the nucleus, mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) to the mitochondria and a palmitoylation signal to the plasma membrane and endocytic vesicle.

There are advantages and disadvantages to each system, relating to ease of use, specificity, photostability etc… I do not want to go into that.

Here, I would like to mention two new methods to image the plasma membrane.

Continue reading

Transcription caught on camera part 1: Halo transcription factors

Transcription factors (TFs) have a fundamental role is regulating gene expression. The basic model, based on numerous biochemical analyses, has determined where TFs bind (usually at specific sites at or near promoters), when they bind the DNA (at a resolution of minutes/hours) and what do they do there (induce/repress transcription. Duh!).  However, much is yet unknown. One aspect that is fairly unknown is the dynamics of how TFs search for their binding sites, bind them and later dissociate, particularly at the single molecule level. To explore this, the Transcription Imaging Consortium (TIC) at Janelia Research Center (JRC) (it used to be Janelia Farm, but the  “farm” part was removed from the name. oh well) applied sophisticated imaging techniques to measure the dynamics of two TFs, SOX2 and OCT4 in the nuclei of live embryonic stem (ES)cells. Their results were published in Cell almost a year ago.

Continue reading

Imaging gene expression – methods & protocols

A new book in the “Methods in molecular biology” series, recently published, contains 23 imaging protocols in three major research areas: gene expression & RNA dynamics, genome & chromatin dynamics, and nuclear process & structures.

book cover: Imaging Gene Expression

This is a fairly good overview of the field and can help both beginners and researchers looking for new ideas.

The book can be freely downloaded.

Here’s the contents of the book:

Continue reading

If you chew that mRNA, you must make a new one!

Gene expression is very complex.  My paper, which was published in Cell today, just shows that it is more complicated than previously realized.

Traditionally, eukaryotic gene expression is divided into five steps:

Continue reading

About the header picture

This picture was taken by me a long time ago (6 years, i think). Contrary to the name of the blog, this is not GFP.

To take this picture, I performed Immunofluorescence experiment. The procedure is as follows:

Cells are treated with whatever you are invetigating (in this case – cells were treated with 0.5mM  arsenite for 30 min).

Cells are them fixed by a crosslinking agent (in this case, para-formaldehyde). As of this moment, the cells are dead, and macromolecules (proteins, DNA, RNA) are fixed in their place.

Cells are treated with detergent (to open pores in the membrane) and irrelevant protein (e.g. BSA) to block the possibility of non-specific binding of antibodies.

Cells are then incubated with an antibody that recognizes the protein of interest (primary antibody), and then with a secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody.

The secondary antibody is conjugated to a fluorofore – a small fluorescent molecule. In this case Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), which is excited at 494nm and emits light at 518nm, i.e. green light.

This picture was taken by an epifluorescence microscope. You can see the cell morphology; you can detect the nucleus (large oval area in the middle); and you can also detect multiple granules in the cytoplasm (these are P-bodies and stress granules).  However, the picture isn’t sharp, for some cells it is out of focus, and in most cells, the fluorescent intensities of the nucleus and some granules glow too strong to allow good view of the nearby cytopalsm. Such problems can be resolved by using more advanced microscopy, like confocal. I hope that by next week I will have new, better pictures to show.