Fluorescent protein databases

Two new awesome databases for fluorescent proteins are now available: FPbase and Fluorescent Biosensor database.

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My tenure-track faculty position search

My career goal is to get a tenure-track faculty position at an academic institution. My career took several twists & turns (see this eLife “Scientist and Parent” article). Once my main postdoc paper was accepted, I thought that I am finally ready to begin this search. I guess I was wrong.

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A molecular ribosome counting mechanism – where’s the data?

A recent paper in Nature from the lab of Pavel Baranov and collaborators suggests a new type of mechanism of translation regulation. However, After discussing this paper in a journal club today – I’m not convinced about their model. Continue reading

MS2 mRNA imaging in yeast – problem solved

Previously, on the story of MS2 labeling of mRNA in yeast: Roy Parker published a short letter to the editor, indicating that the MS2 system might cause accumulation of 3′ fragments. We wrote a response, showing that it is not always the case for endogenously expressed mRNAs, but it is exaggerated when over-expressed (Part 1)*. Later, Karsten Weis’s group confirmed Parker’s initial observation but their report still had some questions unanswered, and no solution to the problem; I was unhappy (Part 2).  Now, Evelina Tutucci and Maria Vera together with Jeet Biswas (all from Rob Singer’s lab) seem to have resolved the issue and solved the problem, with the development of the MBS version 6Continue reading

Intercellular mRNA transfer through membrane nanotubes – behind the scenes.

My paper was recently published. I suggest that you read it before reading this post (it is an open access paper). In this paper we show that full-length mRNA molecules can be transferred between mammalian cells through membrane nanotube-like extensions that connect the cells.

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New CRIPSR-based RNA imaging tool

About a year and a half ago I wrote here about new uses of CRISPR/Cas9 as an imaging tool. In particular, I was excited about the possibility to use enzyme-dead Cas9 (dCas9) as an RNA binding protein for live imaging of mRNA. Unfortunately, in my hands this did not work (the dCas9 has exited the nucleus with non-targeting guide RNA at the same rate as with the specific guide RNA).

Last week, a new CRISPR tool was published in Nature, from Feng Zhang’s lab.

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Quantum dots for Immunofluorescence — Rapha-z-lab

An important post on quantum dots:

Guest post by Dave Mason In modern cell biology and light microscopy, immunofluorescence is a workhorse experiment. The same way antibodies can recognise foreign pathogens in an animal, so the specificity of antibodies can be used to label specific targets within the cell. When antibodies are bound to a fluorophore of your choice, and in […]

via Quantum dots for Immunofluorescence — Rapha-z-lab